Coastal Conservation News Archive

A complete archive of our past news articles, beginning in Fall 2016; older articles from our previous website are available in the historical archive

Special Volunteer Needed for King Tides Project

CoastWatch collaborates with the state’s Coastal Management Program on the King Tides Project every year. Through this project, volunteer photographers document that highest tides of the year. We have a trove of photographs, growing in value every year, as we develop an ever-more-detailed portrait of the coast’s vulnerability to flooding and sea level rise. However, the photos, to be really...Read more
Siuslaw watershed during the most recent king tide.\Photo by Rena Olson, with aerial support from Lighthawk.

King Tides Project Looks Ahead

Siuslaw watershed during the most recent king tide.\Photo by Rena Olson, with aerial support from Lighthawk. The King Tide Project is already looking ahead to its 11th year. It may be spring, but in our plans, to borrow a line from a certain TV show, winter is coming! Here are the dates for the 2020-2021 version of the project, through which volunteer...Read more

Rocky Habitat Plan Enters Next Phase

Otter Rock tidepools at low tide.\Photo by Laurel Hillmann. On June 1, we finally begin the "site designation" process, the long awaited opportunity for the public to shape the state's emerging Rocky Habitat Management Strategy by proposing special levels of protection for key rocky intertidal and offshore areas. Between now and December, individuals, groups,...Read more

CoastWatching Moves Online

CoastWatchers Dave and Diane Bilderback conducting a beached bird survey. The coronavirus crisis poses particular difficulties for a program like CoastWatch, which brings people together for educational events and projects on the shore, while encouraging volunteers to monitor a shoreline which is currently closed to many. But the program has now pivoted to an...Read more
Volunteers removing Scotch Broom in the Oregon Dunes.\Photo by Dina Pavlis.

Scotch Broom Stalkers Needed in May

Volunteers removing Scotch Broom in the Oregon Dunes.\Photo by Dina Pavlis. As invasive plants on the Oregon coast go, Scotch Broom is second only to European beachgrass in the extent to which it has occupied and reshaped shoreline, bluff, and dune habitats. The Western Invasives Network has declared a Great Scotch Broom Census, to take place during the entire...Read more

Oregon Shores Battles Jordan Cove on Local Fronts

Jordan Cove (top of photo) and the North Spit.\Photo by Alex Derr. The struggle to prevent development of an LNG (liquefied natural gas) export facility on Coos Bay’s North Spit, to which Oregon Shores is deeply committed, is fought on many fronts: national, state, and local. We have been deeply engaged for more than a decade in the effort to prevent the Jordan...Read more

Public Comment on Rocky Habitat Plan Due

Tidepool at Cape Perpetua.\Photo by Briton Ogden. The public has one more chance to offer comments on Oregon’s newly emerging Rocky Habitat Management Strategy. After several years of work—in which Oregon Shores has participated actively—an all-but-final draft is being considered. The Ocean Policy Advisory Council (OPAC) is expected to consider adopting the...Read more

Coast Bike Route Up for Discussion

Biking the Oregon coast.\Photo courtesy of ODOT. The Oregon Coast Bike Route (OCBR) exists in concept. It runs 370 miles the length of the state and is traveled by an estimated 6,000 to 10,000 riders annually. It was designated in the 1980s. But it is essentially Highway 101. The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) began a planning effort for the OCBR in...Read more
Snowy Plover.\Photo by Mick Thompson

Snowy Plover Patrol Training Now Online

Snowy Plover.\Photo by Mick Thompson The nesting season for the endangered Western Snowy Plover is due to begin in Oregon, and in an ordinary year the Snowy Plover Patrol would be about to start monitoring sites on the north coast again. In this unique year, though, with coronavirus precautions in place, the in-person training sessions (which had been scheduled...Read more
Staying afloat in turbulent times.\Photo by Alex Derr.

Coastal Conservation in the Time of Coronavirus

Staying afloat in turbulent times.\Photo by Alex Derr. Oregon Shores’ board and staff members are watching the COVID-19 pandemic carefully. We take very seriously the well-being of our staff and our hundreds of deeply valued volunteers and supporters. No public events are being scheduled for the time being. We urge our members—and everyone—to take all possible...Read more